PhotoAbout Us

Come Know Us Better

Champa aur chinti, orissa culture and lifestyle

Champa Aur Chinti (Frangipani & the Ant) .Non.Governing.Oneness. is a socio- craft entrepreneurial venture run on a business model. It is based out of Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. This business model envisions to have various craft & handloom related subsidiaries as co-operative societies and SHG (Self Help Groups) under its aegis. Next step is to register all the SHGs as Champa Aur Chinti Non Governmental Organization. Primal goal is to establish the Champa Aur Chinti Craft Trust Ltd, which will be governed by a Board of Trustees representing all the important walks of social fabric.

Champa Aur Chinti is the brain child of Siddartha Patnaik. He happens to be the foundational floor of the organization with a support pillar team of 10 professional & skilled individuals who happen to collectively work towards total customer satisfaction in the niche market of Sustainable Fashion & Lifestyle products for contemporary usage by being a reliable source of creative design & quality production centre.

The organization took is gestational form since 2005 in the form of a poem written by Siddartha as a random use of words, leading to sentences & eventually becoming the Mission Statement for this organization.

Champa aur chinti, orissa culture and lifestyle

Since its inception, the company has been doing constant research & development, experimentation working in the area of Indian Art, Handicraft & Handlooms by giving product development concepts to skilled artisans & other professionals like Pattern Master, Tailor, and Hand Embroider etc to develop Sustainable Fashion & Lifestyle products for contemporary usage.

On Saturday, 15th May 2010; company made its presence on Facebook, a popular social media & networking site. It is garnering enough support & encouragement since then.

Champa Aur Chinti (Frangipani & the Ant) .Non.Governing.Oneness. took a formal shape on Thursday, 1st January 2015 to embark on a long journey, on to the path named Life. Bon Voyage!

The company’s present forte happens to be Odisha’s Kotpad Mrigan Community handloom textiles, Pipli Appliqué & Patachitra art along with its associated crafts like Palm Leaf Engraving, Paper Mashie, and Wood Carving etc.

The company made its global web presence on Sunday, 11th January 2015 by participating in Tedx Textile Toolbox Event.

On 1st February 2015, company started its design studio & office from a modest set up in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India with the joining of the following :

Aslam Khan as the Head Pattern Master & Senior Garment & Product Technician.

Priyanka Khuntia Patachitra Artisan.

Subash Kumar Sahoo as Patachitra Artisan & Mr Siddartha Patnaik as Founder.

Shipakar Guru Gangadhar Moharana as Senior Traditional Patachitra Artist & Visiting Consultant.


MISSION Statement


Champa Aur Chinti (Frangipani & the Ant) .Non.Governing.Oneness.

A tree manifests (in the womb of a seed).

A seed carries the life.

Keeps the life posted to the next generations.

From the first raindrop...to the whitish ivory sprout.

A tree unfolds a story...as if Granny narrating stories, a Pandora’s box, nostalgic smell from your old class book.

First love letter,

Your childhood photographs in black & white spectrum or a sepia shades,

What a bliss!

Tree is...not selfish- a saint,

Tree is a true friend through thick-n-thin.

The philosophy behind “CHAMPA AUR CHINTI (Frangipani and the Ant) Non Governing Oneness” is

for you, me & all; it is about us & one...being together in the journey called Life.

“Champa aur Chinti”...are reflections, identity given to me, love expressions, nostalgia, Nick names given by pals.

“Champa Aur Chinti” is about being together. Us, we, all, they & everyone.

At “Champa Aur Chinti” it’s not about being an I specialist, I mean ego, its about working as family.

Wanting-needing everyone to be a V specialist.


Company Objective


* To run Champa Aur Chinti (Frangipani & the Ant) .Non.Governing.Oneness. on a business model to generate optimum revenue resources to establish cooperative societies as SHG (Self Help Groups) under Patachitra & Applique craft of Odisha.

* To establish a platform for the artisans & the participating-practicing product designer to connect with global clientele to meet its demands based on an indigenous system for production of lifestyle products using handicraft & handlooms of Odisha on Sustainable Design methods.

* To establish an indigenous system for production to benefit the artisan communities, where the overall interest of target market, its end users & the basic needs to be satisfied through the collective goal in the business model by the participating product designer & the core artisan team.

* To strengthen the structural system with virtues like self empowerment of the artisan communities, timely delivery of products, quality, fair trade ethical practice by the product designer etc which are offered through dedicated team & skilled human resource through the business model.

* To create sustainable growth opportunities & support structure for the artisans communities & the practicing product designer in the given business model.

* To create a constant supply chain mechanism between the artisans community-practicing product designer & the global market place through the business model.

* To inculcate various procedures of quality assurance, homogeneous merchandise production, innovative value addition, product packaging etc for addressing the global market scenario & the overall market credibility & success of the business model.

* To involve larger numbers of individuals from the artisans community & its subsidiary units for creating a valuable human resource for the raw material production system in terms of fiber, yarn, natural dye stuff, natural dyeing etc.

* To strengthen the village / rural economy by creating work opportunities for various artisan communities at its site so that the mass migration to urban cities could be put to check, to ensure the art & craft doesn’t become a languished case study topic of research.

* To do capacity building of the village / rural economy by creating job opportunities for in-direct craft & handloom subsidiaries like farmers, carpenters, potters etc who will strengthen the craft & handloom from outside being in the support structure.

* To introduce sustainable, innovative & technical inputs cohesive to the practice, to strengthen the age old anthropogenic expression without altering its core structure & adhere to its ancient / historic sense of purity in design.

* To initiate the same map for various professionals like product designer, business manager, teachers, bankers, senior citizens to join the umbrella to create a Craft Trust with the help of self-help groups belonging to various artisan communities.


Buy Authentic Indian, Organic and Natural Art work

Exclusively from www.champaaurchinti.com

See Our Product Showcase

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoArt & Artisans

Art, Artisan & Cultural Aesthetics

  • Kotapad Textiles

    All dyed hand woven cotton textiles from Kotpad, Koraput district, with color extracted from the Madder Root (Morinda citrifolia) from Odisha, India

    Learn more
  • Pipili Appliqué

    Temple textiles used in the annual Cart Festival at Jaganath Temple, surface embellished through hand-work, from Odisha, India

    Learn more
  • Pattachitra Hand Painting

    Mineral based pigment, traditional hand scroll, paintings from odisha, India

    Learn more

Cultural History of Weaving & its trade in Odisha

sun temple odisha, orissa, india

The complex and chequered history of Odisha is clearly reflected in the art, handicrafts & handlooms. The state was known for its renowned maritime culture and a flourishing production of textiles. It traded its fine and coarse cottons, silks and mixed fabric, with Sri Lanka, Indonesia (Aceh), Malaysia (Kedah) and Myanmar (Pegu, Arakan and Tennasserim). Odisha had a prosperous coastal trade within the country, through the ports of the Coromandel Coast, (Spice Route) Calcutta (Kolkata), Dhaka, Malabar and Gujarat.

culture of odisha, orissa, india

Under the Mughals, political and economical uncertainty began to grow as the local Afghan chiefs, in their attempt to break free the Mughal dominance, often clashed with each other. They declared themselves as the independent rulers of Bihar and Odisha, and often gained the support of local zamindars (landlords). In this already a murky situation, the East India Company gained entry in Odisha by establishing a set-up in Balasore (now Baleshwer) in 1633. Earlier in the same year, they had set a factory further inland in Cuttack, which they found to be unsafe and far from where they ship docked at Balasore. Fear stalked the lives of the weavers, who were caught in the cross fire between the merchants they wove for the local warlords. Marauding soldiers often showed their might by razing whole weaving village to the ground, ‘spearing’ weavers who had received “good English silver’ as an advance for the production of fabrics. In these circumstances the East India Company created a captive weaver population by providing protection to the factories it had set up in Balasore, Badrak and Balaramagadi, which were fortified encampments. It was said ‘in the last century, peaceful industry in Odisha was possible only within the range of English canon.’ In the intervening period between 1751 and 1803, the Marathas made inroads into Odisha, initiating the drain of its natural resources, including rice and salt levied a heavy custom duty on the import of cotton into Odisha from Maharashtra through Raipur to Sambalpur. This was because Odisha did not produce enough cotton for its widespread, cotton-weaving belt. The textile industry began to languish as cotton prices rose until 1803, when the British took away the governance once again.

For a short period till 1833 the export of fine cotton fabrics grew steadily, until the Charter Act was passed and Odisha was open to the import of British goods. These were promoted by selling agents from Calcutta to Chandbali, and from Balasore to Cuttack, sounding the death knell for local fine cottons, which have been the chief article of commerce for nearly two centuries. Large numbers of the weaving population were reduced to penury.

culture of odisha, orissa, india

The tussle between fine and coarse, plain and patterned cotton has thus, been a long-standing one, especially in the non-tribal coastal regions of the state. The tribal districts of the north, central and south have always largely produced a distinct range of coarse cotton saris for specific communities. Mulberry silks have over taken tussar silk saris since the 1970s, but there are some selected areas specializing in tussar saris with definite potential for further growth. Ikat (yarn-resist) saris and fabric have been seen the greatest proliferation since the 1970s, though at the cost of other patterned areas of production. Therefore, the categories of the traditional map have largely been obliterated not only by increase of Ikats or Bandhas in cotton and silk, but also by the increasing use of mercerized cotton yarns, which don’t require brush-sizing. However, it is best to understand the categories as they once existed in order to further explore their potential.


Kotapad Textiles

The culmination of this tribal belt is the village of Kotapad in Koraput district, which continues to weave a small number of the most sophisticated coarse count three-shuttle, weft-patterned end-piece saris. The Mae Lugda Tarap Pata worn by the bride's mother, especially at weddings, & the Kansa Bandhi are prime examples of the single colour Gaal or Madder dyed saris brought by the Gadaba & Paroja tribes from the forest of Malkangiri district.

kotpad textile of odisha, orissa, india

The fabrics of Kotpad are absolutely unique as these fabrics are completely non-chemical. Rough to the touch, they are dyed with the reddish tinge of the roots of the Indian Madder (Aal) tree. It is eco-friendly, non-toxic and hence non-harmful to the skin. In fact, it is even said that the magic weaves of Koraput actually have a healing effect! The powerful and vibrant colors range from deep maroon to dark brown depending on the proportion of dye used and the addition of sulfate of iron.

This limited, but deep and mysterious color range is offset by the natural unbleached off white of the major portion of the fabric, producing dramatic results. The reddish color is offset by creams and blacks with motifs drawn from nature and their way of life. Some of them are crab, conch, boat, axes, fan, bow, temple, pots, snakes, palanquin bearers, and huts.

The Kotpad weavers, also called ‘Mirgan,’ make saris, gamchas and tuvals. Typically, these minimalist saris indicate the wearer’s identity and mark the rites of passage in a woman’s life. Depending on the occasion, the saris get a bit more elaborate, such as a wedding, as shown by elaborate designs on borders and muhs, (pallavs), dominated by the kumbha. The tuval is worn by men as a lower garment which also has typical Kotpad borders and motifs. The dimensions of the sari too varied from the short knee-length eight haath (one haath is the length from fingertips to elbow) to the ankle-length 16 haath.


Pipili Appliqué

It is said that the kings and nobility of Odisha had patronized the Pipli Appliqué work. At one time, the appliqué work of Odisha is said to have reached the heights of excellence. In Odisha, kings engaged craftsmen in the Jagannath Temple. In 1054, Maharaja Birakshore is said to have appointed ‘Darjis’ to serve the temple. The ‘darjis’ provided regular supply of the items required for the rites performed at the temple patronized by kings and nobility of Odisha, appliqué work at one time had reached the artistic heights of excellence. The kings of Puri engaged craftsmen in the service of Lord Jagannath and set up village Pipli for them to live in.

kotpad textile of odisha, orissa, india

It is also believed that appliqué work made its way into western India either from Europe or Arabia in the Middle East through trade contacts. In the 19th century, the Kathis, an agro-pastoral community of the Kathiawar region of Gujarat and their Muslim associates, the Molesalaams, or the land owning community are known to have produced intricate appliqué work. Some of the surviving specimens show a wide representation of stylized human and animal figures in cotton and silk cloths. In the neighbouring state Rajasthan, the Oswal Banias have a similar tradition of stitching large appliqué canopies with a range of panels or squares in different colour combinations, for marriages. The Rajputs, Satwaras and various other cattle-breeding communities also produce similar appliqué art to enhance the beauty of their chandarvo (canopies), dharaniyo (quilt covers), among other things. In the Eastern part of the country, Pipli a small city near Bhubaneswar has the distinction of providing a special artistic name and fame to the creativity involved in the process of Appliqué work and the products produced. Pipli and other parts of the Puri and Khurda district of Odisha are famous for the intricate and artistic appliqué work. Now in India, the artisans of the state like Rajasthan, Gujarat, Bihar and Odisha are practicing the craft. In Gujarat and Rajasthan Kathis, Molesalem, Satwara, Meher, Mahojan and Rabri caste produces canopies, wall hangings, door curtains, bullock, chariot and camel covers etc by using appliqué technique. Quilting on appliqué fabric called Ralli is the uniqueness of the artisans of Rajasthan. Some artisans of Tanjore in Tamil Nadu were also producing epical hanging with the help of appliqué technique. However, the craft making has been extinct now.

kotpad textile of odisha, orissa, india

In Odisha( pipili ) the appliqué making( chandua ) is culturally associated with the rituals of Lord Jagannath temple of Puri. As per old documents available Maharaja Birakishore appointed Shri Jagannath Mohapatra, Shri Banamali Mohapatra, Shri Rama Maharana and Shri Siba Maharana of Puri for the purpose in the year 1054 AD. Maharaja Mukund Dev appointed Shri Ganesh Mohapatra for the same purpose in the year 1280 AD. A certificate was issued in 1754-55 AD indicating that Shri Padan Maharana, Shri Narayan Maharana and the Loknath Maharana served as sevaks for the same purpose. Raja Mukunda Dev authorized Shri Loknath Mohapatra to charge a fixed amount on all offerings of tailored materials for Lord Jagannath in the year 1920. A similar certificate was also issued under the seal of Rani Suryamani Devi during the reign of Raja Dibyasingha Dev. Shri L. Panda in his book “ Record of Rights-Shri Jagannath temple, Puri” and published by Temple Administration of Puri has mentioned about it.

Though the form is not unknown in other parts of India, it is Odisha and especially Pipli, a small town near Bhubaneswar that the craft has a living and active tradition continuing over centuries. While the largest number of appliqué craftsmen is concentrated in Pipli, there are quite a few in Puri and very small numbers in Khallikote, Parlakhemundi and Boudh areas also. Now the growing popularity of the craft also attracted the artisans of other districts to practice this unique avocation.

It is believed that the origin and development of the appliqué work in Odisha dates back to ancient times. The appliqué craft originated in the district of Puri appointed artisans called Darji by caste as sevak- the people appointed by the king of Puri for looking after the day-to-day rituals of Lord Jagannath temple for regular supply of appliqué article required for the day-to-day seba (rites in the temple) of Lord Jagannath. In exchange of the seva, they were provided land ownership for their contribution of appliqué craft for the rituals of Lord Jagannath. During that time, the king also used to determine the quality and price of the appliqué craft to be procured from the suppliers. The available historical evidence on Odisha art and architecture suggest that the appliqué craft of Odisha dates back to the 12th century, when the temple of Lord Jagannath was built at Puri (1135 AD). However, when the craft came under the Muslim influence in the 16th century, more creative and intricate designs introduced and the appliqué product became items of artistic possessions. Hence the seventeenth and the eighteenth centuries witnessed a flourishing phase in the creation of appliqué craft, with the master craftsmen of Pipli producing highly decorative and attractive art pieces. Legends and folk tales suggest that the appliqué products were initially made to cater to the requirements of the Jagannath temple, mainly to adorn the three deities, Jagannath, Balabhadra and Subhadra, as well as the number of other deities in the temple vicinities. These prized artistic works were also sought for by the Maharajas, Sultans, Nawabs, Zamindars, prosperous traders and other connoisseurs of art and architecture. In Durbars, royal ceremonies and religious festivals, appliqué pieces formed prestigious decorations. Historical record reveals that appliqué works of Pipli were being dispatched to far off places, like Nepal, Bhutan, Bihar and Rajasthan during the past.

It is believed that the origin and development of the appliqué work in Odisha dates back to ancient times. The growth of the craft was limited to the district of Puri and Khurda. The practicing craftsmen are called Darji –a caste and formed a part of the sevaks- the people engaged by the king of Puri for looking after the day-to-day rituals of Lord Jagannath temple. These artisans were the regular suppliers of appliqué article required for the day-to-day seva (rites in the temple) of Lord Jagannath. In exchange this seva, they were provided land ownership by the Kings. During that time, the king also used to determine the quality and price of the appliqué craft. The available historical evidences on Odisha art and architecture suggest that the appliqué craft of Odisha dates back to the 12th century, when the temple of Lord Jagannath was built at Puri (1135 AD). However, when the craft came under the Muslim influence in the 16th century, more creative and intricate designs introduced and the appliqué product became items of artistic possessions. Hence the seventeenth and the eighteenth centuries witnessed a flourishing phase in the creation of appliqué craft, with the master craftsmen of Pipli producing highly decorative and attractive art pieces. Legends and folk tales suggest that, the appliqué products were initially made to cater to the requirements of the Jagannath temple, mainly to adorn the three deities, Shri Jagannath, Balabhadra and Subhadra, as well as the number of other deities in the temple vicinities. These prized artistic works were also sought for by the Maharajas (kings), Sultans, Nawabs, Zamindars (land lords), prosperous traders and other connoisseurs of art and architecture. In Durbars, royal ceremonies and religious festivals, appliqué pieces formed prestigious decorations. Historical record reveals that appliqué works of Pipli were being dispatched to far off places, like Nepal, Bhutan, Bihar and Rajasthan during the past. Intertwined with Rituals and Traditions: As many other crafts of Odisha, the root of the appliqué art and craft form is intertwined with the rituals and traditions of Lord Jagannath, the presiding deity of the Puri temple. The appliqué items are mainly used during processions of the deities in their various ritual outings. Products like ‘Chhati’. ‘Tarasa’ and ‘Chandua’ are extensively used for the purpose. However, the appliqué work in its colorful best is most prominent in the cloth cover of the three chariots of the presiding deities in which they travel every year during the ‘Ratha Yatra’ or Car Festival.

Traditionally, the appliqué work of Odisha is used as canopies during the annual Chariot Festival at Puri to protect the chariots of Lord Jagannath (in this context, the Lord of the Universe), Balabhadra and Subhadra (Lord Jagannath’s brother and sister, respectively. Together the three constitute the Hindu Holy Trinity of the holy city of Puri. As per tradition, the colour scheme of the three covers is predetermined. The chariot of Balabhadra known as “Taladhwaja” has a cloth covering of bright green and red, while that of Subhadra known as “Padmadhwaja” or “Darpadalana” has a cover of bright red and black. The chariot of Lord Jagannatha called “Nandighosha” has a cover of bright red and yellow. This tradition of the famous Rather Yare of Lord Jagannath is continuing from time immemorial. As per tradition, the pilgrims coming to Puri offers banners- the banners decorates the top of the Lord Jagannath temple and considered as holy and precious. Three colored fabrics i.e. red, yellow and white are used to prepare these banners for the temple. These banners are also prepared by the artisans of the appliqué craft with simple decorative appliqué works. Shri B.C. Mohanty in his book “Appliqué craft of Odisha” (1980) has mentioned that Darji Caste inhabitants of Puri were appointed by king to supply the requirements of tailored articles including appliqué work like the Chariot cover with its surface decorative ornamentation, Pankha (Fan), Alata (Divine Insignia), Chata (Umbrella) etc for Lord Jagannath and other deities.


Pattachitra

It is a general term for traditional, cloth-based scroll hand-painting, based in the eastern Indian state of Odisha. In the Sanskrit language, "Patta" literally means "cloth" and "Chitra" means "picture". Most of these paintings depict stories of Hindu deities.

kotpad textile of odisha, orissa, india

Pattachitra is a traditional painting of Odisha, India. These paintings are based on Hindu mythology and specially inspired by Jagannath and Vaishnava cult. All colours used in the Paintings are natural and paintings are made fully old traditional way by Chitrakaras that is Oriya Painter. Pattachitra style of painting is one of the oldest and most popular art forms of Odisha. Pattachitra is a painting done on canvas, and is manifested by rich colourful application, creative motifs and designs, and portrayal of simple themes, mostly mythological in depiction. The traditions of pattachitra paintings are more than thousand years old.

The painting the 'pattachitra' resemble the old murals of Odisha especially religious centres of Puri, Konark and Bhubaneshwar region, dating back to the 5th century BC. The best work is found in and around Puri, especially in the village of Raghurajpur.

Pattachitra is pigment based hand painted ritualistic painting. A representation of the deities in this style is used in the main sanctum sanctorum when the lord & his siblings are sick after the ritualistic bath ceremony with 108 pitchers in the temple courtyard, on Snana Purnima day. Lord & his siblings falling sick are under treatment & thus cannot give public appearance or darshan to their devotees; however as a revered symbolic token, a pattachitra scroll is kept outside the main door of innermost chamber representing individual deities in demi-God form so that the omnipresence is felt & sacred sanctity is maintained. Only three special pattachitras, traditional Oriya paintings of natural colours on cloth stiffened with starch, known as Anasara Pattis, are strung on a bamboo screen hiding the deities from public view, can be seen by the public. During this period, the deities are given only roots, leaves, berries and fruits to cure them from their indisposition. This ritual is a reminder of the strong tribal elements in the genesis and evolution of the Jagannatha cult. The progeny of Lalita, daughter of the original tribal worshipper Biswabasu, chieftain of hunters, and the Brahmin priest Vidyapati, are known as daitapatis or daitas. They have almost exclusive privilege of serving the Lord during the convalescence and through the entire period of Ratha Jatra or the Festival of Chariots. After the festivities are over, they wait for one long year to be back in the service of divinity.


Text reference & source

1. Sari (Styles, Patterns, History, Techniques) Paperback – Import, 24 Sep 2002, by Linda Lynton (Author), Sanjay K Singh (Illustrator), Thames and Hudson; New edition edition (24 September 2002).

2. http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/Arts/decoart/handcraft/orissa/applique.htm Dated 25 /05/10

Buy Authentic Indian, Organic and Natural Art work

Exclusively from www.champaaurchinti.com

See Our Product Showcase

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoProjects

Our Project Portfolio

Champa Aur Chinti (Frangipani & the Ant) .Non.Governing.Oneness. is presently offering a range of Up-cycled CD (these CDs have been discarded and are an E-waste) hand-painted in Patachitra painting from Odisha, India.

A range of hand-painted Canvas shoe is being made to promote the ancient art form of Patachitra where only floral, geometric & animal motifs are used keeping the religious ethos in consideration.

Keep visiting the page & be on the lookout for other exciting Sustainable Fashion ranges; We are COMING SOON!

Portfolio+

Patachitra

Patachitra in traditional patti by Shilpakar Guru Gangadhar Moharana

This art work is based on the popular Odiya idiom “Thirteen festivals in twelve months” reflecting various festivals, practices, crop cultivation & lifestyle revolving around Jaganath cult. Traditional patti or the cloth canvas has been used for making this patachitra art by Shilpakar Guru Gangadhar Moharana.

×
Portfolio+

Patachitra

Patachitra paintings on Discard Plastic Bottle.

Discarded Plastic Bottles of various consumable products like Water Bottle, Fabric Softener, and Oil Containers etc are used to make flower vases. Imagery is based traditional Patachitra iconography like dancing figurines, animals, floral vines etc. The technique used here is both traditional patti & modern decoupage. This project aims to minimise the human wastage based on plastic which is been introduced into the nature & it’s non-biodegradable aspect harms the eco-system. Ms Jingyasa Mohanty is the artist behind this project.

×
Portfolio+

Patachitra

Patachitra painting on Canvas Shoe.

Painting non-religious design vocabulary of Patachitra on canvas shoes makes them widely accepted across all caste, creed & colour without any prejudice. This makes the usage of traditional art form more global & more in sync with changing times. Shilpakar Guru Gangadhar Moharana is the senior consultant artist behind this project.

×
Portfolio+

Patachitra

Patachitra painting on Object d’ art / collectibles.

Painting non-religious design vocabulary of Patachitra, on various forms in different textures makes them widely accepted as Object d’ art or collectibles in modern context. This makes the usage of traditional art form more global & more in sync with changing times. Shilpakar Guru Gangadhar Moharana is the senior consultant artist behind this project.

×
Portfolio+

Patachitra

Patachitra paintings on Discarded Cartons

Discarded Cartons of various consumable processed food products like Tea, Incense Stick, and Cornflakes etc are used to make paintings based on juxtaposed traditional Patachitra iconography with modern day graphic imagery. This project aims to minimise the wastage of paper cartons which already has used tree based products for its synthesis. Ms Jingyasa Mohanty is the artist behind this project.

×

efficiency and reliability

This is a simple hero unit, a simple jumbotron-style component for calling extra attention

Go Shopping Now..!

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoOur Team

Champa Aur Chinti

Meet Our Team

Champa Aur Chinti (Frangipani & the Ant) .Non.Governing.Oneness. is an equal opportunity work place where gender, caste, creed, color, religious faith, physical abilities, differently able or orientation are not considered as criteria for selection & being an integral part of the team. Creative hand-skills, sincerity, integrity, honesty, ownership etc qualities apart from basic education are sought after, for defining various roles to a given profile.

  • Aslam Khan

    aslam khan Product Drafting & Cutting as a Pattern Master & Head Technician champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india
    Product Drafting & Cutting as a Pattern Master & Head Technician
  • Subash Kumar sahoo

    Subash Kumar sahoo champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india
    Patachitra Artisan
  • Priyanka Khuntia

    Priyanka Artisan champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india
    Patachitra Artisan
  • Gangadhar Moharana, Shilpakar Guru

    Gangadhar Moharana is a Shilpakar Guru & National Award winner Artisan of Patachitra champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india
    Senior Traditional Patachitra Artist & Visiting Consultant.
  • Siddartha Patnaik

    siddartha patnaik managing director champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india
    Founder

Get to know them Better


Aslam Khan

aslam khan Product Drafting & Cutting as a Pattern Master & Head Technician champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india

Aslam Khan is working as Head Pattern Master, Cutter & Senior Garment Technician, Champa Aur Chinti since Sunday, 1st February 2015. He learnt about the basics of tailoring in standard three while studying in school. He had to discontinue his education when he was studying in standard eighth & took up tailoring as a livelihood means to sustain his family’s needs. He was born in the year 1965 & his father’s name is Late Sikandar Khan. He is married to Farida Bibi & has two sons, Arshad Khan & Akeed Khan. He hails from Bhadrak district in Odisha.

He started his career by setting up a tailoring shop in the princely town of Khordha, near to Bhubaneswar from 1992 to 1997. He moved to New Delhi after 1997 & started to learn more about tailoring of Western designs & worked at Arya Brothers Showroom in New Delhi, a company which gave him insight to the nuances of the trade. His next 4 years from 1997 to 2001 were spent in Green Park, New Delhi doing odd jobs & then he joined the Mata Chandan Devi Hospital, Janakpuri in the field of hospital related textile goods & worked there for 5 years, till 2006. He worked for a brief period of six months at Gujaral Showroom in Rajouri Graden, did odd jobs in between for six years & worked for a year at Karol Bagh showroom; this was 2012 & moved back to Odisha.

His last job in 2015 was at a Ladies tailoring unit, next to Newman Tailors, behind Trident College in Bhubaneshwar. The unit closed down due to unethical practices by the owner.

Aslam came in touch of Champa Aur Chinti through reference of Fariyaad Master, as they hail from same village in Bhadrak district. He likes the work he is doing for Champa Aur Chinti & identifies with our design philosophy.


Subash Kumar sahoo

Subash Kumar sahoo Artisan champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india

A professionally trained Palm Leaf engraver & painter artisan, working as Trainee Patachitra Artisan with Champa Aur Chinti since July 2016. He has done a course in Palm Leaf work from SIDAC (State Institute for Design of Art & Craft, Govt. of Odisha).

He is “Chupaa Rustom” (literally means hidden warrior / dark horse) of Champa Aur Chinti as he is an expert in tailoring & can stitch on a manual pedal machine as well as motor machine. Thus he triples up as Palm Leaf engraving artisan, Trainee Patachitra artisan & an adept Tailor.

He is High School pass out with 60% marks & holds a 2nd division. Champa Aur Chinti envisions making him complete his graduation through a reputed national open school & college.








Priyanka Khuntia

Priyanka Khuntia  Artisan champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india

A professionally trained Palm Leaf engraver & painter artisan, working as Trainee Patachitra Artisan with Champa Aur Chinti since 22 March 2015. She has done a two year course in Palm Leaf work from Directorate of Handicrafts & Cottage Industries, Industries Department, Govt. of Odisha in June 2009 & 2011. From SIDAC (State Institute for Design of Art & Craft, Govt. of Odisha), she has completed Patachitra training from 22nd August 2011 to 7th August 2012.

She is “Woman Friday” of Champa Aur Chinti as she is an excellent with office administration work like – costing of products, costing file updating, client order file upkeep, product despatch etc.

She is High School dropout & Champa Aur Chinti envisions for making her complete her education through open schooling.








Gangadhar Moharana

Gangadhar Moharana is a Shilpakar Guru & National Award winner Artisan of Patachitra champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india

Gangadhar Moharana is a Shilpakar Guru & National Award winner Artisan of Patachitra & is working as In-house Patachitra Senior Artist, Champa Aur Chinti since Saturday , 1st August 2015 on a project basis.. A paramparik or traditional artisan by birth, he has been trained by his father in Ganjapa Card painting & making along with formal training under a guru in Patachitra.

His main focus of work at Champa Aur Chinti is to make hand painted apparels using the rich vocabulary of Patachitra in traditional format. Presently he is working on a commissioned piece of Patachitra depicting “thirteen festivals, associated ritualistic cultural festivals & yearly crops spread across twelve months”- an popular Odiya idiom.






Siddartha Patnaik

siddartha patnaik managing director champa aur chinti odisha, orissa, india

Siddartha is Founder & MD, Champa Aur Chinti. A NIFT alumnus in Fashion & Textile Design with Graduate & Post Graduate professional degree, moved to Kolkata & New Delhi to graduate & post- graduate in the years 2000 & 2002 respectively.

His methodical & organized approach clubbed with down to earth attitude, gets him going on the passion to promote Odisha’s rich plethora of Sustainable handicrafts & handlooms for contemporary market opportunities.

Being ethical & firm believer of cooperative philosophy combined with fair trade practitioner, he strives hard to bring about a change – significant or insignificant for, to & by the artisan community at large.

Presently based out of Bhubaneswar, focusing to nurture the bigger dream & vision to establish Champa Aur Chinti Cooperative Craft Trust Ltd.

Buy Authentic Indian, Organic and Natural Art work

Exclusively from www.champaaurchinti.com

See Our Product Showcase

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoServices

Champa Aur Chinti

Services we Offer

Comming Soon...

Buy Authentic Indian, Organic and Natural Art work

Exclusively from www.champaaurchinti.com

See Our Product Showcase

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoOur Clientle

Champa Aur Chinti

Our Esteameed Clients

Comming Soon...

Buy Authentic Indian, Organic and Natural Art work

Exclusively from www.champaaurchinti.com

See Our Product Showcase

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoShop

WASH CARE & OTHER INSTRUCTIONS

1. Silk based products to be Dry Cleaned periodically as per the usage by the end customer.

2. While Ironing on Silk / Acrylic hand paint – for Ironing Silk, please put a cotton cloth on the product before ironing. Reverse / inside out ironing where acrylic colours are used.

3. Naturally dyed (Green Textiles) textiles shouldn’t be cleaned / washed with fabric softeners, chemical detergents etc. This will lead to discolouration. Just wash them in plain water as its naturally dyed; the components have a healing effect on skin.

4. After washing the naturally dyed product, don’t dry it in direct sunlight as it will lead to discolouration. Always dry it in shade.

5. All our Cotton products with respect to apparel are pre-shrunken.

6. For any other assistance / Customer Care, write to info@champaaurchinti.com

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoNews & Media

Highlights and current events

ORISSA POST    
Date : 22 to 28 MAY 2016

ODISHA LIVE TV    
Date : 28 MAY 2016

Indian Express (Sunday Express Magzine)    
Date : 13 March 2016

Buy Authentic Indian, Organic and Natural Art work

Exclusively from www.champaaurchinti.com

See Our Product Showcase

Powered By : SITVENTURE

PhotoContact Us

We are Here

House No 15, Phase-2, Sweety Housing Complex
Ganga Nagar, Unit-6
Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
PIN -751020
+91 9777514781
+91 9938452085
info@champaaurchinti.com

Email Us

On the Map

Powered By : SITVENTURE

X